Frusteration Doesn't Quite Define It

30 03 2008

Would it kill these crocheting people to write in ENGLISH?! I’ve been trying for days to do this pattern without any idea what to do after I sc 6 and make a slip stitch. I can understand that far.

Would it absolutely devastate their little secret code of honor to write these things out in a plain, readable language? Honestly, it could be in German for all I care. I’ve got Google translator for that… but there’s no “Crochet to English” setting!!!

I’m a few weeks away from having my bachelor’s in English with a minor in communication. Yet for some reason, I can’t figure out what manner of English they’re using to try to communicate a pattern to me.

*headdesk* x 30

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6 responses

30 03 2008
wildwoodflwr

What part exactly don’t you understand?

30 03 2008
wildwoodflwr

What part exactly don’t you understand?

31 03 2008
wildwoodflwr

Ok.. here’s what you got. The instructions are telling you how to make a closed circle instead of a spiraly one. When you finish this, it will look like each row was done individually instead of spiralling out from the center. So, the chain 1 (yes, chain 1 just like a base chain) will make that happen. So just do it.. Just make a chain. Next, you single crochet twice into the next stitch. You know how on spiralling circles, when you want it to go larger, you put two stitches in one stitch? That’s what you’re doing. All the way around. Two stitches in each stitch of the previous row. Then, when you get back to that original chain 1 (it will be sticking up higher than the previous row, you can’t miss it) slip stitch your current stitch (on the hook) into that chain 1. Ta Da! The “end” bit only means you end that row. Any more questions? Toss ’em at me lol.

31 03 2008
wildwoodflwr

Ok.. here’s what you got. The instructions are telling you how to make a closed circle instead of a spiraly one. When you finish this, it will look like each row was done individually instead of spiralling out from the center. So, the chain 1 (yes, chain 1 just like a base chain) will make that happen. So just do it.. Just make a chain. Next, you single crochet twice into the next stitch. You know how on spiralling circles, when you want it to go larger, you put two stitches in one stitch? That’s what you’re doing. All the way around. Two stitches in each stitch of the previous row. Then, when you get back to that original chain 1 (it will be sticking up higher than the previous row, you can’t miss it) slip stitch your current stitch (on the hook) into that chain 1. Ta Da! The “end” bit only means you end that row. Any more questions? Toss ’em at me lol.

31 03 2008
wildwoodflwr

ok…a little clarification. Clarification is good for beginners. :PThe “end” bit means you end that row. That doesn’t mean you stop or cut the yarn or anything. Just that you are done making that row. Anything you do after that will be a new step or a new row. And I think the 12 single crochet you are seeing is just telling you how many stitches in that row you should have when you are done. If you’re referring to the (12sc) written at the end of the pattern line. Normally in most patterns, the author/creator will put the number of stitches you end up with in parenthesis at the end of each row. That way you can check to make sure you are on track.Maybe I’ll do a tutorial-esque blog explaining the finer points of pattern instruction. It took me forever to learn all this nitpicky stuff.

31 03 2008
wildwoodflwr

ok…a little clarification. Clarification is good for beginners. :PThe “end” bit means you end that row. That doesn’t mean you stop or cut the yarn or anything. Just that you are done making that row. Anything you do after that will be a new step or a new row. And I think the 12 single crochet you are seeing is just telling you how many stitches in that row you should have when you are done. If you’re referring to the (12sc) written at the end of the pattern line. Normally in most patterns, the author/creator will put the number of stitches you end up with in parenthesis at the end of each row. That way you can check to make sure you are on track.Maybe I’ll do a tutorial-esque blog explaining the finer points of pattern instruction. It took me forever to learn all this nitpicky stuff.

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